Review – Composite II Speeches

Composite II Speeches (Up to August 2015)

Items of Interest

Included below are reviews of 29 speeches. I attended most of these speeches and found others on the internet. I combined these speeches into a “Composite speech.”

One of the speakers was an archeologist. His answers to my questions:

  1. The ancestors of the Dakota Indians were not Minnesota’s first residents.
  2. The ancestors of the Dakota Indians arrived in present day Minnesota about 600 A.D. from the central Mississippi River area.
  3. The ancestors of the Dakota Indians never occupied all of Minnesota.
  4. It cannot be proven there are Dakota remains in all of the burial mounds in Minnesota.

General Comments

  • There are many unproven allegations, incorrect generalities and incorrect statements in the following statements.
  • Some of these statements are complicated and need more details than what I can give here.

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Review – Lincoln and the DW – Speeches

 CSPAN – American History TV
Hosted by Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia and the U.S. Capitol Historical Society, Washington DC
Lincoln and the Dakota War of 1862
November 15, 2012
http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/DakotaW
Updated March 17, 2016

Items of Interest

Text of the three speeches is provided, however, the text for the first two speeches has many gaps and incorrect words.

General Comments

  • Disrespectful – People, especially Henry Sibley, are criticized unjustly, without showing proof. Sibley should be praised for his actions during and after the Dakota War of 1862.
  • Unbalanced – The trials of the Dakota Indians following the Dakota War of 1862 are criticized. Nothing is said about the charges against the 38 who were hanged. Nothing is said about the atrocities committed by hostile Dakota. Little is said about what to do with the hostile Dakota who violated the laws of warfare. Nothing is said about the Dakota trial system.
  • The legality of the Dakota trials is questioned. President Lincoln reviewed these trials and did not call them illegal. Nothing is said about this.

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Review – Lincoln and the U.S. Dakota War Speech

 Hosted by Minnesota Historical Society
War within War: Lincoln and the U.S.-Dakota War of 1862
By David A. Nichols
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lyYJNwCeTc
Reviewed July 28, 2013

 Items of Interest

Nichols wrote Lincoln and the Indians: Civil War Policy and Politics. He was introduced by a member of the MHS staff.

 A report by George E. H. Day is discussed in the Introduction and by Nichols. The following is summarized from Nichols, Lincoln and the Indians…:
In August 1861, George E. H. Day was sent to Minnesota to “use and recommend such measures as will be most likely to promote peace between the Indians and the whites.” In October 1861, Day reported he had facts “showing voluminous and outrageous frauds upon the Indians.” He implicated the Indian Agents up to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The U.S. Indian Office took no action. Day sent a letter to President Lincoln. It isn’t known if Lincoln saw Day’s letter. No action was taken on Day’s report. Day threatened to take this to the public if the administration did nothing. To view a copy of Day’s letter to Lincoln, see: http://chgs.umn.edu/educational/addInfo/Letters/dayLincoln.pdf

General Comments

  • The title of this video implies this speech is about the Dakota War of 1862. A good part was about Indians and Indian officials in other states.
  • Unbalanced – While the Dakota War, the trials of the Dakota, the hanging of the 38 and the removal of Dakota from Minnesota are mentioned, there is no mention that the hostile Dakota killed more than 650 white men, women and children.

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Review – Composite I-b Speeches

Composite I-b Speeches (1991-January 2013) 

Items of Interest

From 1991 to January of 2013, I attended some 55 speeches. Rather than review each speech separately and comment on the same statements over and over, I decided to combine these speeches into a “Composite speech.”

 I tried to eliminate duplicate statements. Related statements, separated by hyphens, are combined into paragraphs. I added some words to keep the original meanings of these statements. In some cases, I suspect the statement is wrong but cannot prove this at this time. These statements are identified with my statement, “Is this correct?”

The Composite Speech is divided into 2 parts. The 1st part contains statements on events prior to the Dakota War. The 2nd part contains statements starting with the Dakota War. 

General Comments

  • Unbalanced – Overwhelmingly, the speakers talked about the Dakota people after the war and their recovery. Few discussed the whites after the war and their recovery.
  • Unbalanced – No one speaks for all white people just as no one speaks for all Dakota people. Among the Dakota as among the whites, there is a wide range of opinions and feelings about the Dakota War of 1862.

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Review – Composite I-a Speeches

Composite I-a Speeches (1991-January 2013)
Updated on March 17, 2016

 Items of Interest

 From 1991 to January of 2013, I attended some 55 speeches. Rather than review each speech separately and comment on the same statements over and over, I decided to combine these speeches into a “Composite speech.”  I tried to eliminate duplicate statements. Related statements, separated by hyphens, are combined into paragraphs. I added some words to keep the original meanings of these statements. In some cases, I suspect the statement is wrong but cannot prove this at this time. These statements are identified with my statement, “Is this correct?”  The Composite Speech is divided into 2 parts. The 1st part contains statements on events prior to the Dakota War. The 2nd part contains statements starting with the Dakota War.

 General Comments

  •  Many speakers assume the audience is already familiar with this history.
  • Disrespectful – According to most speakers, the fur traders and the U.S. Government are criticized without providing proof.
  • Listeners should not believe everything a speaker says. Professor William Lass said that the historian needs to be skeptical. The listener also needs to be skeptical.
  • Beware the politician who claims to be a historian. 

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